Iron

The presence of a risk factor for a certain disease in a person means that the statistical probability of doing this disease is greater in that person than in another person.

Dietary Fiber

Example: High blood cholesterol is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Conversely, this does not mean that a person who has normal cholesterol has no chance of developing a cardiovascular problem.

Recommended fiber intake

Mineral trace element in the composition of red blood cell hemoglobin, muscle myoglobin, and numerous enzymatic reactions necessary for cell respiration. Iron is present in the body in very small quantities: 4 g in humans and 2.5 g in women

Fluor

The iron brought by the diet is more or less well absorbed. There are two types of iron: heme iron in meat and fish, well absorbed by the body (10-30% is absorbed) and non-heme iron in cereals, pulses, Fruits, vegetables and dairy products (1 to 5% is absorbed). The absorption of iron also depends on the nature of the meal and the presence in the meal of substances which promote or inhibit the use of iron by the body, thus vitamin C stimulates the absorption of iron while tea, Coffee and certain dietary fibers impede its absorption.

Fortification

The body's iron requirements are higher in children, women of childbearing age because of menstruation, and in pregnant and lactating women.

Recommended iron intakes (in milligrams)

Children from 1 to 3 years

7

Children from 4 to 6 years

7

Children from 6 to 9 years old

8

Children from 10 to 12 years old

10

Teenagers aged 13 to 16

13

Adolescents from 13 to 16 years old

16

Teenagers aged 16 to 19

13

Adolescents 16-19 years old

16

Adult Men

9

Adult Women

16

30

Women breastfeeding

10

Men over 65 years old

9

Women over 55

9

Person over 75 years old

10

: Recommended nutritional intakes for the French population, Agence Française de Sécurité Sanitaire des Aliments, 3rd edition, Ed. Tec & Doc.

* Iron requirements during pregnancy are so high that it is usually necessary to take supplementation.

When iron requirements are not met appears an iron deficiency that can have many consequences on health. The best known is the appearance of anemia that needs to be treated. Other less conspicuous consequences of iron deficiency are reduced exercise capacity, fatigability, decreased intellectual performance, reduced resistance to infections and disturbances during pregnancy.

Of all mineral foods, iron is the one whose physiological needs are best met by dietary intakes. In developing countries iron deficiency is widespread because diet does not provide enough. However, even in industrialized countries where iron-rich foods are abundant, iron deficiency exists in the most exposed groups, pregnant women and children, who sometimes have to be given iron supplements.

Foods rich in iron (mg / 100g)

Roasted Pigeon

20.0

Yeast food

18,0

Breakfast type "All-Bran"

14.0

Black pudding cooked

14.0

Cocoa powder without sugar

11.5

Rabbit in stew

10.5

Poultry liver cooked

9.1

Soy flour

9.0

Wheat germ

9.0

Veal liver cooked

8,0

Raw lens, dry

7,6

Mold cooked

7,3

Beef heart cooked

7.0

Pistache

7.0

Country pate

6.1

Egg yolk

5.7

Muesli

5.6

Beef, roast

4.5

This term includes several types of substances such as cellulose, hemi-celluloses, pectins, gums, mucilages or lignin, which have in common their very low digestibility. While representing a certain volume the fibers do not bring any calories.

They are found in the bran of whole grains, in certain legumes (beans) and some fruits (red berries, apples).

Dietary fiber in foods improves intestinal transit and prevents constipation. Fiber is recommended for diabetics because it improves the digestion of sugars. Studies have shown the preventive effect of fibers on atherosclerosis by increasing cholesterol elimination. The protective effect of fibers on the appearance of colon cancer has also been demonstrated.

The consumption of dietary fiber, which was very important in the past, has greatly diminished with the evolution of modern urban food: more meats, more white flour and lipids and less cereals and pulses Br>

In order to preserve a good physiological balance, it is recommended to consume 30 to 35 g of fiber in the diet per day, ie 150 to 200 g of cooked green vegetables or 150 to 200 g of raw vegetables or 150 to 200 g of fruit, the remainder Being supplied by whole or enriched cereals in bran and by legumes.

The fibers in legumes can cause abdominal bloating and flatulence in some people. One can then recommend the consumption of cooked green vegetables whose fibers are more digestible (leeks, celery) and advise to cook the vegetables dry for a long time with a seasoning low in lipids.

Foods high in fiber (g / 100g)

Breakfast type "All-bran"

27,0

Dried coconut

23,5

Yeast food

22.0

White raw bean, dry

21,0

Fig, dry

18,5

Wheat germ

16,8

Dry Prune

16.0

Fruit of the passion

15,9

Rye flour

15.3

Almond

15,0

Fresh coconut

13,6

Lens dry raw

11.7

Soy flour

11.6

Sesame

11.0

Whole wheat flour

9.0

Dry date

8,7

Complete bread

8,5

Grilled peanut, salted

8,4

Grated horseradish

8,3

Currant

8,3

Wheat puffed

8,0

White bean, cooked

8,0

Oat flake

7.0

Chestnut

6,8

Cooked peas

6.1

Trace element that attaches to the enamel of the teeth and makes them much more resistant to the attacks of plaque bacteria. There is not at all in food and a small amount in drinking water and table salt.

It must therefore be given as a supplement to the child throughout the period of tooth formation, in the prevention of dental caries. Later it is brought locally by toothpastes and other products for oral use.

Fluoride may be toxic if absorbed in excessive quantities.

A technique for improving the nutritional value of a food or a food by the addition of nutrients missing or present in an insufficient quantity in that food.